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Svyatoslav Yefimov
Svyatoslav Yefimov

Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12: How to Read a Classic Novel and Improve Your English


Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12: A Classic Novel for English Learners




Do you want to improve your English skills while reading a classic novel? Do you enjoy stories about love, loss, and redemption? If so, you might want to check out Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12, a simplified version of the famous novel by George Eliot. In this article, you will learn what Silas Marner is about, what Oxford Bookworms is, why you should read this book, and how it can benefit your English learning. By the end of this article, you will be eager to download the PDF and start reading right away!




silas marner oxford bookworms pdf 12



Introduction




What is Silas Marner?




Silas Marner is a novel by George Eliot, published in 1861. It tells the story of Silas Marner, a weaver who lives a lonely and isolated life in the village of Raveloe. Silas was once a respected member of a religious community, but he was falsely accused of stealing money and exiled. He lost his faith and his friends, and became obsessed with hoarding gold. However, his life changes dramatically when he finds a little girl on his doorstep, who he adopts as his daughter. The novel explores themes such as betrayal, forgiveness, family, and social class.


What is Oxford Bookworms?




Oxford Bookworms is a series of graded readers for English learners. Graded readers are books that are adapted from original texts to suit different levels of language proficiency. They use simplified vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure, while retaining the main plot and characters of the original. Oxford Bookworms has six levels, from Starter to Stage 6, each with a different word count and difficulty. The series covers a wide range of genres, from classics to thrillers, from fiction to non-fiction.


Why read Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12?




Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12 is a level 4 book, which means it has about 1400 words and is suitable for intermediate learners. It is a faithful adaptation of the original novel, but with some simplifications and modifications to make it easier to understand. You can download the PDF for free from various websites, such as PDF Drive. You can also listen to the audio version on YouTube. Reading this book will not only help you improve your English skills, but also expose you to a classic work of literature that has been praised for its realism, humor, and moral depth.


Summary of Silas Marner




Part 1: Silas's life in Raveloe




The novel begins with a description of Silas Marner, a weaver who lives alone in a stone cottage near the village of Raveloe. He is a strange and mysterious figure to the villagers, who avoid him and spread rumors about him. He has no friends or family, and his only joy is his gold, which he earns from his work and hides in a hole under his floor. He counts his money every night, and dreams of increasing his wealth.


One day, his gold is stolen by Dunstan Cass, the younger son of the local squire. Dunstan is a reckless and greedy man, who needs money to pay his debts. He sees Silas leave his cottage, and sneaks in to take the money. He then disappears, and no one knows what happened to him or the gold.


Silas is devastated by the loss of his gold. He feels like he has lost everything, and he has no hope or purpose in life. He goes to the village to report the theft, but the villagers are suspicious and unsympathetic. They think he is hiding something, or that he has brought a curse upon himself.


Part 2: Silas's life with Eppie




On New Year's Eve, Silas has a fit, which is a condition that makes him lose consciousness and fall to the ground. He has had these fits since he was young, and they are one of the reasons why he was accused of stealing money in his previous community. During his fit, he leaves his door open, and a little girl wanders into his cottage. She is the daughter of Molly Farren, a poor woman who was secretly married to Godfrey Cass, the elder son of the squire. Godfrey is a weak and unhappy man, who regrets marrying Molly, who is addicted to opium. He loves Nancy Lammeter, a beautiful and respectable young woman, who he hopes to marry someday.


Molly was on her way to reveal her marriage to Godfrey at the New Year's party at the squire's house, but she collapsed and died in the snow, leaving her child alone. The child followed the light from Silas's cottage, and crawled up to his hearth, where she fell asleep on a fur rug. Silas woke up from his fit, and saw the child's golden hair shining on the floor. He thought it was his gold returned to him, but then he realized it was a living child. He felt a sudden surge of love and compassion for her, and decided to keep her as his own.


He took her to the party, where Godfrey recognized her as his daughter. He was secretly relieved that Molly was dead, and that his marriage was over. He decided not to claim the child, but to let Silas adopt her. He thought he could now marry Nancy, and forget about his past.


Silas named the child Eppie, after his deceased mother. He raised her with the help of Dolly Winthrop, a kind and pious woman who lived nearby. Eppie brought joy and meaning to Silas's life. She made him smile and laugh, and she taught him how to love and trust again. She also brought him closer to the villagers, who became more friendly and respectful towards him. Silas became a happy and respected man, thanks to Eppie.


Part 3: Silas's life with his past




Sixteen years later, Eppie is a beautiful and cheerful young woman, who loves Silas more than anything. She is courted by Aaron Winthrop, Dolly's son, who wants to marry her and move to a bigger town. Eppie agrees to marry him, but only if Silas comes with them. She does not want to leave Silas alone.


One day, some workers are draining a nearby stone pit, which belongs to the squire. They find the skeleton of Dunstan Cass at the bottom of the pit, along with Silas's gold. It turns out that Dunstan fell into the pit while trying to hide the money after stealing it from Silas.


The squire returns the money to Silas, who is surprised but not overjoyed. He says that he does not need the money anymore, because he has Eppie. He also says that he wants to use some of the money to help others who are in need.


Analysis of Silas Marner




Themes and symbols




One of the main themes of Silas Marner is the contrast between isolation and community. Silas starts as a lonely and alienated man, who has lost his faith and his friends. He only cares about his gold, which symbolizes his materialism and selfishness. However, when he loses his gold and finds Eppie, he discovers the value of human relationships and social bonds. He becomes a part of the village, and learns to trust and care for others. He also regains his faith, which symbolizes his spiritual growth and redemption.


Another theme is the contrast between appearance and reality. Many characters in the novel are judged by their outward appearance, rather than their true character. For example, Silas is seen as a weird and wicked man, because of his pale face, his fits, and his profession. However, he is actually a kind and honest man, who has suffered injustice and misfortune. On the other hand, Godfrey is seen as a respectable and generous man, because of his good looks, his wealth, and his position. However, he is actually a weak and selfish man, who has lied and betrayed his wife and child.


A third theme is the contrast between fate and free will. The novel shows how the characters' lives are shaped by both chance and choice. For example, Silas's life changes dramatically by two random events: the theft of his gold and the arrival of Eppie. These events are beyond his control, but they also lead him to make important decisions: to adopt Eppie and to forgive Godfrey. Similarly, Godfrey's life is affected by both luck and action: he is lucky that Molly dies and that his marriage is annulled, but he also chooses not to claim Eppie and to marry Nancy.


Characters and relationships




The novel has a rich and diverse cast of characters, who represent different aspects of human nature and society. The main character is Silas Marner, who undergoes a remarkable transformation from a bitter and lonely man to a loving and happy father. He is contrasted with Godfrey Cass, who remains a dissatisfied and guilty man despite having everything he wants. Eppie is the catalyst for Silas's change, as she fills his life with joy and meaning. She is contrasted with Nancy Lammeter, who is a virtuous and loyal woman, but who cannot have children of her own.


The novel also portrays various types of relationships, such as family, friendship, love, and marriage. The most important relationship is between Silas and Eppie, who form a strong bond based on mutual affection and gratitude. They are an example of a true family, even though they are not related by blood. Another important relationship is between Godfrey and Nancy, who have a troubled marriage based on deception and regret. They are an example of a false family, even though they are legally married.


The novel also shows how the characters interact with their social environment, such as the village of Raveloe. The villagers are mostly simple and good-hearted people, who have their own customs and traditions. They are initially wary of Silas, but they gradually accept him as one of them. They also help him raise Eppie, and support him in times of trouble. They are an example of a supportive community, even though they are not very educated or sophisticated.


Style and language




The novel is written in a realistic style that reflects the author's interest in social issues and moral questions. The author uses detailed descriptions to create a vivid picture of the setting and the characters. She also uses dialogue to reveal the characters' personalities and emotions. She mixes different dialects and accents to show the differences between the characters' backgrounds and classes.


The novel also uses various literary devices to enhance its meaning and effect. For example, the author uses irony to show the contrast between what the characters expect and what actually happens. She also uses foreshadowing to hint at future events or outcomes. She also uses symbolism to convey deeper messages or themes.


Benefits of reading Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12




Improve your vocabulary and grammar




Reading Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12 can help you improve your vocabulary and grammar in several ways. First, you can learn new words that are related to the topic and the genre of the novel. For example, you can learn words such as weaver, loom, goldsmith, squire, opium, and redemption. Second, you can review words that you already know, but that are used in different contexts or meanings. For example, you can review words such as fit, cottage, hearth, skeleton, and pit. Third, you can learn how to use words in different forms and combinations. For example, you can learn how to use nouns as adjectives, such as stone pit and fur rug; how to use verbs in different tenses and moods, such as past simple, past perfect, and conditional; and how to use prepositions and conjunctions to connect ideas, such as in spite of, because of, and even though.


Enhance your comprehension and critical thinking




Reading Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12 can also help you enhance your comprehension and critical thinking in several ways. First, you can improve your reading skills by following the plot and the characters of the novel. You can practice how to identify the main events and the conflicts of the story; how to infer the motives and the feelings of the characters; and how to predict what will happen next or how the story will end. Second, you can improve your analytical skills by exploring the themes and the symbols of the novel. You can practice how to interpret the meaning and the message of the author; how to compare and contrast different aspects of the novel; and how to evaluate the strengths and the weaknesses of the novel. Third, you can improve your creative skills by expressing your own opinions and reactions to the novel. You can practice how to write a summary or a review of the novel; how to relate the novel to your own experience or knowledge; and how to imagine alternative scenarios or endings for the novel.


Enjoy a captivating story and learn about culture




Conclusion




Recap of the main points




In conclusion, Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12 is a great book for English learners who want to read a classic novel. It is a simplified version of the original novel by George Eliot, which tells the story of Silas Marner, a weaver who lives a lonely and isolated life until he finds a little girl who changes his life. The novel explores themes such as isolation and community, appearance and reality, and fate and free will. The novel also has a rich and diverse cast of characters, who represent different aspects of human nature and society. The novel also uses a realistic style and various literary devices to create a vivid and engaging story.


Call to action and recommendation




If you are interested in reading Silas Marner Oxford Bookworms PDF 12, you can download it for free from PDF Drive. You can also listen to the audio version on YouTube. Reading this book will help you improve your vocabulary and grammar, enhance your comprehension and critical thinking, and enjoy a captivating story and learn about culture. I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves classic literature and wants to improve their English skills. You will not regret it!


FAQs




Q: Who is the author of Silas Marner?




A: The author of Silas Marner is George Eliot, which is the pen name of Mary Ann Evans. She was a famous English novelist of the 19th century, who wrote realistic and psychological novels such as Middlemarch, The Mill on the Floss, and Daniel Deronda.


Q: What is the genre of Silas Marner?




A: Silas Marner is a novel that belongs to the genre of realism. Realism is a literary movement that emerged in the 19th century, which aimed to depict life as it is, without idealizing or romanticizing it. Realist novels often focus on ordinary people and their everyday problems, and use detailed descriptions and dialogue to create a realistic effect.


Q: What is the setting of Silas Marner?




A: Silas Marner is set in England in the early 19th century, during the Industrial Revolution. The story takes place in two locations: Lantern Yard, which is a fictional town in the north of England, where Silas used to live; and Raveloe, which is a fictional village in the Midlands, where Silas moves after being exiled.


Q: What is the moral of Silas Marner?




A: Silas Marner has several morals or lessons that can be learned from reading it. One of them is that money cannot buy happiness, but love can. Silas learns that his gold does not bring him any joy or satisfaction, but only makes him more isolated and miserable. However, when he finds Eppie, he discovers the true meaning of happiness and fulfillment. Another moral is that honesty is the best policy, but forgiveness is also important. Godfrey learns that his lies and secrets only cause him more trouble and pain, but he also gets a chance to redeem himself by confessing and apologizing to Nancy and Eppie.


Q: What are some other books similar to Silas Marner?




A: Some other books similar to Silas Marner are: - Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, which is a classic novel about love, marriage, and social class in 19th century England. - Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens, which is a classic novel about an orphan boy who faces poverty, crime, and injustice in 19th century London. - Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, which is a classic novel about a young woman who overcomes adversity and finds love in 19th century England. - Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy, which is a classic novel about a young woman who suffers tragedy and injustice in 19th century England. 71b2f0854b


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